Share us
Thanks!

Size

Asus EEE Pad Slider SL101 – unboxing and an early preview

I’ve been struggling to get my hands on the new Asus EEE Pad Slider for like two weeks now and I finally did. I’ll only have it for the next couple of days, and this is a review sample, but it’s pretty much identical to what you’ll find in stores in the near future, probably in a couple of weeks or so, both in Europa and in the US.

Now, this post is only the first from a long series that will come here on the site in the next couple of days. And since I just got the tablet, you can find below an unboxing video and some first look impressions, plus a quick comparison to the other popular tablets on the market, in terms of size and width, like the iPad 2, the Iconia tab A500 and the Asus EEE Pad Transformer.

Before checking out the clip though, I do have to add a couple of details for those of you that might not be familiar with the EEE Pad Slider: it is an Android Honeycomb powered tablet with a 10.1 inch IPS display and a Tegra 2 platform inside, so pretty much on par with most other Android tablets out there right now.

Asus EEE Pad Slider SL101 - we finally got it

Asus EEE Pad Slider SL101 – we finally got it

However, you’ll notice that it is bulkier and heavier, as it comes with an integrated sliding keyboard. In fact, that’s the first tablet to use such a mechanism and it’s similar to what we saw earlier on Nokia smart phones (like the older N97 and the new E7). This does add a lot of functionality to the tablet and I’ll bet many of you will love the form factor, but I for one kind of enjoy more the Transformer and the fact that you don’t have to carry the keyboard around all of the time.

Anyway, here’s the clip below:

And here are some of my first impressions. First, the things I liked:

  • this tablet looks staggering. It’s incredibly solid built and nicely design, and materials used feel good;
  • the sliding mechanism is sturdy and will probably deal well with time; also, it acts like a stand;
  • the IPS display is bright and crisp, plus offers great colors and viewing angles (it’s in fact the same screen as the one on the Transformer);
  • comes with Android 3.1 so feels quite snappy in everyday use;
  • you get mini HDMI, micro SD card slot and full-size USB 2.0 port included;
  • you get a chiclet keyboard

And some things I didn’t quite like:

  • the sliding mechanism acts like a stand, as I said, however you can’t adjust the viewing angle in any other way than the default one, which is fine when using the tablet on a desk, but not that great during everyday use, when for instance trying to play on the tablet while in bed or when trying to watch a clip. Having an IPS panel does help, as viewing angles are good, but still it can be a bit frustrating;
  • there’s no trackpoint or optical-pad included, thus you won’t be able to utilize the tablet without touching the screen unless you connect a mouse (luckily, there’s USB for that);
  • the keyboard has a lot of flex and keys are a bit small; plus, i feel like the space between them is too wide for accurate and fast typing, but I’ll get back on that after using the tablet for a while;
  • there’s a physical reset button on the left side of the tablet (I mistook it for a button for Wi-Fi in the clip above). Can’t really understand why they had something like that on a tablet (perhaps that’s Asus’s way of acknowledging that Android is still buggy :P), but luckily it’s a bit deepened into the frame so can’t be pressed accidentally. Still, this does remind me of Windows 98…
The Sliding mechanism is the main attraction

The Sliding mechanism is the main attraction

That’s pretty much all for now. Like I said, the Slider will stay on my desk for a couple of days only and I’ll post more articles and videos about it in the next days.

If you guys have any questions or just want me to test any particular thing on the tablet, just let me know in the comments below. For now, I’ll just leave you with another short presentation clip.

And some photos:




About the Author
Mike
Andrei "Mike" Girbea is the Owner and Editor-in-Chief of TabletBite.com . He's a Computers Science graduate and technology has been one of his passions since childhood. After working as a Tech Journalist between 2005 and 2008, he now focuses on his own projects, like this one.


Last updated: November 1, 2011 | Published: August 8th, 2011
Tags: , , , ,


  1. Adam

    Mike,
    you should show us more FullHD flash movies. I’d like to know if all flash videos in 1080 are playing smoothly.


  2. I am utterly besotted by this device. A tablet that comes with a slide out keyboard-brilliant,shher genius. I’d buy it just for the genius of the physical architecture. The slide out keyboard is what drew me like a magnet to the Torch 9800 and Playbook.


  3. marcel

    Hi Mike,
    I used to have Windows xp and I tunes and an Iphone 4, but since I have the slicer, i cant update my iphone via Itunes anymore:-( Any suggestions?
    Furthermore, if i connect a printer via the usb, where can I find the printer?
    It doesn’t have feature like “my computer or something like that.
    Please help


    • @marcel sry mate, i don’t really get the question.. I don’t see the connection between the Slider (i guess by slicer you mean the slider) and itunes…


      • marcel

        sorry Mike<

        How can I get I tunes on my android tablet, so I can upgrade the software for my Iphone 4. and secondly, can you connect a brother printer with this asus sl101 slider? If I connect the usb cable, nothing happens:-(


      • Marcel, there’s no iTunes for Android so you can’t use your tablet for sync-ing with your iPhone…

        As for the second question, you would need drivers for that printer for Android, that’s why it’s not working. And I’m pretty sure there are no such drivers. From what I’ve tried, the best bet is to get a printer with an Ethernet connection and have it included in your network, and then just send the files from your tablet to the printer. Or use a bluetooth printer. Bottom point, for the time being there are still limited things you can do with an Android tablet that has an USB port, like connecting a mouse, memory stick and external hard-drive. Printers though, not that much…


  4. marcel

    Thanks very much Mike:-)


Leave a comment or discuss